Friday Fast Picks: Latinx Heritage Month

Non-fiction
Dreams from Many Rivers: A Hispanic History of the United States Told in Poems by Margarita EngleThe middle-grade verse history of Latinos in the United States is told through many voices from Juan Ponce de Leon to modern-day sixth graders to create a compelling story.
This is a beautifully wrought coming-of-age memoir about Maria from Sesame Street. Set in the 1950s in the Bronx, this is the story of a girl with a dream. Emmy Award-winning actress and writer Sonia Manzano plunges us into the daily lives of a Latino family that is loving–and troubled.
In this adaptation for middle graders based on her best selling adult memoir, My Beloved World; Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Sonia Sotomayor’s extraordinary life inspires. Her achievement serves as a true testament to the fact that no matter the obstacles, dreams can come true.
Jabberwalking by Juan Felipe Herrera
A former United States Poet Laureate shares secrets about viewing the world from a poet’s perspective, explaining how “jabberwalking” poets draw inspiration from everything they experience to express themselves in creative ways.
At the age of 8, Reyna Grande made the dangerous and illegal trek across the border from Mexico to the United States, and discovered that the American Dream is much more complicated than it seemed.
This book discusses the iconic photograph of revolutionary Che Guevara taken in 1960 by Cuban photographer Alberto Korda.
Nontraditional, controversial, rebellious, and politically volatile, the Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera are remembered for their provocative paintings as well as for their deep love for each other. Their marriage was one of the most tumultuous and infamous in history–filled with passion, pain, betrayal, revolution, and, above all, art that helped define the twentieth century.
My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero
Diane Guerrero presents her personal story in this middle grade memoir about her parents’ deportation and the nightmarish struggles of undocumented immigrants and their American children.
Fiction
The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo
When Xiomara Batista, who pours all her frustrations and passion into poetry, is invited to join the school slam poetry club, she struggles with her mother’s expectations and her need to be heard.
Perfect Mexican daughters do not go away to college. And they do not move out of their parents’ house after high school graduation. Perfect Mexican daughters never abandon their family. But Julia is not your perfect Mexican daughter. That was Olga’s role. Then a tragic accident on the busiest street in Chicago leaves Olga dead and Julia left behind to reassemble the shattered pieces of her family.
The Closest I’ve Come by Fred Aceves
Marcos wants to get out of Maesta, his hood, away from his indifferent mom and her abusive boyfriend—which seems impossible. When Marcos is placed in a new after-school program, he meets Zach and Amy, whose friendship inspires Marcos to open up to his Maesta crew, too, and starts to think more about his future and what he has to fight for. Marcos ultimately learns that bravery isn’t about acting tough and being macho; it’s about being true to yourself.
Efren Divided by Ernesto Cisneros
While his father works two jobs, seventh-grader Efren Nava must take care of his twin siblings, kindergartners Max and Mia, after their mother is deported to Mexico.
Don’t Date Rosa Santos by Nina Moreno
Rosa Santos, a Cuban American, works to save her Florida town, seeks admittance to study abroad in her homeland, and wonders if love can break her family’s curse
2020-09-18T12:06:04+00:00