Friday Fast Picks: Human Rights Awareness

Speak a Word for Freedom: Women Against Slavery by Janet Willen and Marjorie Gann
A fascinating nonfiction account of the lives of fourteen female abolitionists, some of whom were slaves themselves, from the early days of the antislavery movement to the present.

People Who Said No: Courage Against Oppression by Laura Scandiffio

Sometimes it’s okay to ignore the rules or break the law. In fact, it’s essential! This thought-provoking book features people who did just that. Some, like Rosa Parks, were not originally in positions of political power but came out of the ranks of regular citizens to stand up for human rights.
Going beyond the story of America as a country “discovered” by a few brave men in the “New World,” Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity.
Learn more about these modern mass exoduses, what is fueling them in the 21st century, how nations are addressing the crises, how refugees contribute to and strain communities, and what kinds of solutions could help. Along the way, you’ll meet actual refugees and the people who are trying to help.
This book shows not just how the crisis unfolded in 2014, but also the history of racism and segregation that led up to it, the beliefs and attitudes that fueled it, and how the people of Flint fought and are still fighting for clean water and healthy lives.
Now, more than ever, young people are motivated to make a difference in a world they’re bound to inherit. They’re ready to stand up and be heard – but with much to shout about, where they do they begin? What can I do? How can I help? How I Resist is the response, and a way to start the conversation.
Bryan Stevenson delves deep into the broken U.S. justice system, detailing from his personal experience his many challenges and efforts as a lawyer and social advocate, especially on behalf of America’s most rejected and marginalized people.
This book is an important reminder from one of the world’s most prominent young activists that every single one of the 68.5 million currently displaced is a person– often a young person– with hopes and dreams.
2020-12-11T12:43:11+00:00